Seth Herald

Getting Right: An HIV Outbreak Spurs Change in Austin, Indiana

Ravaged by one of the worst outbreaks of HIV in recent history and an underlying epidemic of injection drug addiction, a small rural community is changing fast as it grapples with the fallout of the crisis. In this 4-part story, reporter Jake Harper and photojournalist Seth Herald tell the story of shifting attitudes, new thinking, and signs of recovery. Go to story.
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Cafeteria workers are among the public employees whose hours are being cut as a result of Affordable Care Act rules, according to a lawsuit by 39 Indiana school corporations.
U.S. Department of Agriculture via Flickr/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Indiana Continues Its Legal Fight Against Obamacare

The right to marry in any state won't be the only gain for gay couples from last week's Supreme Court ruling. The decision will likely boost health insurance among gay couples as same-sex spouses get access to employer plans.

The logic is simple. Fewer than half of employers that offer health benefits make the insurance available to same-sex partners who aren't married. Virtually all of them offer coverage to spouses.

Drs. Mitchell Lunn and Juno Obedin-Maliver, both clinical fellows at the University of California, San Francisco, have spent the past decade studying the health problems of people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer.

Their biggest challenge is the lack of population health data about LGBTQ people. The researchers hope that an iPhone app can change that.

The new app, called PRIDE, will ask LQBTQ participants about their health history and concerns. Their answers will inform a longer-term study, which kicks off in January 2016.

Indiana Continues Its Legal Fight Against Obamacare

Jun 26, 2015
Cafeteria workers are among the public employees whose hours are being cut as a result of Affordable Care Act rules, according to a lawsuit by 39 Indiana school corporations.
U.S. Department of Agriculture via Flickr/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The Affordable Care Act passed its second major test before the Supreme Court Thursday. The justices ruled 6-3 that the federal subsidies were constitutional in all states, regardless of whether they had created their own insurance exchanges or their exchanges are run by the federal government.

Obamacare’s Next 5 Hurdles to Clear

Jun 26, 2015
nd White House Staff react to the House of Representatives passing the bill on March 21, 2010.
Pete Souza / White house

In its first five years, the Affordable Care Act has survived technical meltdowns, a presidential election, two Supreme Court challenges -- including one resolved Thursday -- and dozens of repeal efforts in Congress. But its long-term future still isn’t ensured. Here are five of the biggest hurdles left for the law.

Supreme Court Upholds Obamacare Subsidies

Jun 25, 2015

The Affordable Care Act survived its second Supreme Court test in three years, raising odds for its survival but by no means ending the legal and political assaults on it five years after it became law.

Christine White pays $300 a year more for her health care because she refused to join her former employer's wellness program, which would have required that she fill out a health questionnaire and join activities like Weight Watchers.

"If I didn't have the money ... I'd have to" participate, says White, 63, a retired groundskeeper from a Portland, Ore., community college.

People who buy medical marijuana products might not be getting what they paid for, a study finds. And evidence remains elusive on benefits for most medical conditions, even though almost half the states have legalized medical marijuana.

Seth Herald

Ravaged by one of the worst outbreaks of HIV in recent history and an underlying epidemic of injection drug addiction,  a small rural community is changing fast as it grapples with the fallout of the crisis. In this 4-part story, reporter Jake Harper and photojournalist Seth Herald tell the story of shifting attitudes, new thinking, and signs of recovery.

>>Go to story.

Federal agents have arrested 243 people — including 46 doctors, nurses and other medical professionals — who are accused of running up more than $700 million in false Medicare billings. Charges range from fraud and money-laundering to aggravated identity theft and kickbacks.

Attorney General Loretta Lynch calls it "the largest criminal health care fraud takedown in the history of the Department of Justice."

The new math in healthcare: make money by saving money

Jun 22, 2015
D Gorenstein

Over the course of his career, Dr. Seth Berkowitz has met with patients much like one of his first – a 300-pound farmer in rural North Carolina with diabetes and heart trouble.

“His own diet was highly processed food, and he knew that was making his health worse,” Berkowitz says. “You’d talk with him and he’d be like, ‘Oh, I know what I need to be doing. It’s just not an affordable thing for me.’”

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Looking for the Sound Medicine Radio Hour?

After fifteen years on the air, the Sound Medicine Radio Hour, a weekly news magazine about medicine and health, broadcast and podcast its final new show on the last weekend in April 2015. The archive continues to live on this website. Learn more here.
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